Mission: Impossible – Fallout (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray)

Mission: Impossible – Fallout (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray) (2018)
PG-13 Dir: Christopher McQuarrie | Paramount | 2h 27min

Review By: Matt Brighton | November 20th, 2018

Plot: What’s it about?

Tom Cruise is not human.

Wait, that’s…no…that’s right. Yep. He’s a God. He’s been in the business of making movies for nearly four decades now and business has been good. There’s nothing the guy can’t do. And if you didn’t think that was true all that needs to be done is to watch the latest (sixth) entry in the Mission: Impossible franchise. This one is called Fallout. Cruise, as of this writing, is a mere 56 years old (and looks 36). This is an age when the normal person starts to think about retiring to Florida and playing golf. Tom Cruise learned how to fly a helicopter (in his “spare” time), performed most of his own stunts while jumping from building to building all on a broken ankle. He did just over 100 HALO (High Altitude, Low-Opening) jumps out of a perfectly good plane to get the right shot for the film. It took over a year to get one shot. What we have to ask ourselves is why? What’s Tom Cruise got to prove? He wants to entertain the fans by making the best movies he can. It’s only that Mission: Impossible – Fallout is so good that we can also forgive him for films like The Mummy.

When we last met Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his team, they’d captured Solomon Lane (Sean Harris), the head of an anarchist terrorist group. In this film, they’ve been renamed The Apostles. Their mission, which they’ve chosen to accept, is to bring the world together through chaos. To do this they plan on obtaining plutonium and setting off multiple nuclear attacks around the world. Hunt, meanwhile, saves the life of Luther (Ving Rhames) which allows this group to get their hands on said weapons. IMF Director Alan Hunley (Alec Baldwin) assigns Agent Walker (Henry Cavill) to ensure that their mission to retrieve the plutonium as planned. Ultimately they need to recapture the plutonium, ensure that Walker doesn’t interfere with the way IMF works and also make sure that MI6 agent Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) doesn’t intervene.

There’s a lot going on there and I even left out a few twists and turns. Writer/Director Christopher McQuarrie has crafted something pretty special here, but if not for the on (and off) screen of Tom Cruise, his charm, wit and explosive charisma; none of it would matter. And one would think that with this being the sixth entry in the franchise, it’d be on autopilot. Not true. These films keep getting better. Mission: Impossible – Fallout isn’t only the best film of the series, it’s one of the best action/adventure films ever made. Yes, it’s that good. Tom Cruise has a decade on me. And while I try and figure out why it’s more and more difficult to put on my shoes and socks, Tom Cruise is literally leaping from tall buildings in a single bound.  Life isn’t fair, folks – accept it. But we mere mortals can escape and live vicariously through the immortal known only as Tom Cruise. Enjoy.

Video: How’s it look?

I tend to get a bit technical when watching a movie. I look at the color balance, evidence of grain, artifacting and whatnot. I’m more interested and involved in what the movie actually looks like than what’s going on. With Mission: Impossible – Fallout, I decided I wasn’t going to do that (as much). We’ve got two men jumping out of an airplane at dusk over the city of Paris. Do I really care if there is a blip here or there? Normally, yes. But with this one I sat back and enjoyed the ride. Oh sure, Paramount’s disc looks excellent. It’s a Mission: Impossible film and it’s a Tom Cruise movie. Do you think they’ll release anything less than stellar? Nope. The 2.39:1 HEVC 4K image is simply stunning. Colors pop, detail is amazing and the HDR on the 4K version gives us a bit more depth and dimension than the Blu-ray counterpart. None of this should be a deterring factor, however. It’s entertaining and I found nothing wrong with the way it looks. As expected.

Audio: How’s it sound?

It’s all there. Lalo Schifrin’s iconic score. And more. The included Dolby Atmos mix is everything it can be and everything we want it to be. Then again, what exactly does it sound like when jumping out of an airplane? There’s no speaker in your setup that will go unused and that’s for good reason – the audio for this film positively rocks. Vocals command attention, especially when Tom Cruise talks (which, as you’ve guessed by now, is often). Surrounds offer sonic resonance that fills the room with pure awesome-ness. The sub woofer, that oft-used box on the floor, gets a chance to really strut its stuff. Atmospheric sounds put you even more in the film, but don’t forget – dear viewer – you’re not. You’ll just feel like it.

Supplements: What are the extras?

Disc One – (Ultra HD/4K)
The first disc contains a trio of audio commentaries along wit an Isolated Score. The remainder of the supplements are found on the stand-alone Blu-ray disc.

  • Audio Commentary by director Christopher McQuarrie and Tom Cruise – These two are like long lost brothers. Having worked with one another on a slew of films, they seem to know what the other is thinking. And this is conveyed in the commentary track. McQuarrie isn’t afraid to offer up his thoughts and as the writer and director, he knows his stuff (as does Cruise). He gets a little more “freedom” to express himself in the commentary with actor Eddie Hamilton, however.
  • Audio Commentary by director Christopher McQuarrie and editor Eddie Hamilton – Again, McQuarrie’s dedication to his craft is admirable. We get a bit more technical on this track, but it’s nonetheless nearly as entertaining as the above.
  • Audio Commentary by composer Lorne Balfe – Balfe, who also contributed to one of the supplements on the disc, offers up the most bland commentary of the three, but I also found it interesting. Isolated scores as well as commentary tracks by composers are fairly rare, so this was an unexpected treat.
  • Isolated Score Track

Disc Two (Blu-ray)

  • Audio Commentary by director Christopher McQuarrie and Tom Cruise – These two are like long lost brothers. Having worked with one another on a slew of films, they seem to know what the other is thinking. And this is conveyed in the commentary track. McQuarrie isn’t afraid to offer up his thoughts and as the writer and director, he knows his stuff (as does Cruise). He gets a little more “freedom” to express himself in the commentary with actor Eddie Hamilton, however.
  • Audio Commentary by director Christopher McQuarrie and editor Eddie Hamilton – Again, McQuarrie’s dedication to his craft is admirable. We get a bit more technical on this track, but it’s nonetheless nearly as entertaining as the above.
  • Audio Commentary by composer Lorne Balfe – Balfe, who also contributed to one of the supplements on the disc, offers up the most bland commentary of the three, but I also found it interesting. Isolated scores as well as commentary tracks by composers are fairly rare, so this was an unexpected treat.
  • Isolated Score Track

Disc Three (Blu-ray – Special Features)

  • Behind the Fallout
    • Light the Fuse – This gives us a broad overview of the film with some narration by Cruise and Christopher McQuarrie. We learn of the plot, Homer’s Odyssey and are treated to a montage of scenes from the film.
    • Top of the World – This is a breakdown of the HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) jump. Tom Cruise was the first one to do it on camera. Ever. Essentially it starts at 25,000 feet and the chute is pulled just under 2000 feet. Sounds like fun!
    • The Big Swing: Deleted Scene Breakdown – We get a look at how the Grand Palais was converted into a nightclub in which Tom Cruise’s character had to swing down to the ground (unharmed and with a ticking clock, no less)!
    • Rendezvous in Paris – Inspired by the short film Rendezvous, this is a look at the beauty and awe that is Paris. Some of the scenes are shown along with Cruise riding a motorcycle at 100 mph through its streets. Yes, only Cruise can do this and get away with it.
    • The Fall – The “most dangerous” stunt of the film also makes for one of the more interesting features. We get the backstory of how this stunt was conceived, staged and ultimately filmed. And yes, it’s really Tom Cruise doing it all.
    • The Hunt is On – Car chase? Pffft. Whatever. If it’s a Mission: Impossible movie, why not up the ante? We get a first-hand look at a helicopter chase filmed in New Zealand.
    • Cliffside Clash – The climactic scene between two main characters (I won’t say who) culminates with a fall off a cliff. We head to Norway to see how this one was done and how, once again, no one died.
  • Deleted Scenes Montage – Featuring optional commentary by director Christopher McQuarrie and editor Eddie Hamilton. Running just shy of 4 minutes, the commentary does help as we see a few scenes set to music.
  • Foot Chase Musical Breakdown – Lorne Balfe, the composer, narrates us through this sequence; guiding us section by section.
  • The Ultimate Mission – Cruise narrates us through what’s essentially a glorified trailer. He tells us that “…all Mission: Impossible films have led up to this one.” And you know something, he’s right.
  • Storyboards – Broken down into four different sections:
    • Paris
    • What if?
    • London
    • Helicopter
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Booklet – Stunts: Raise the Bar – a 10 page illustrated booklet detailing some of the stunts in the film.

The Bottom Line

My unequivocal praise for Tom Cruise withstanding, there is absolutely nothing to dislike about this latest Mission: Impossible installment. If you’re looking for an action/adventure film then look no further. If you’re looking to find a fault in Tom Cruise – you won’t. Even at a robust two and a half hours long, this one will have you on the edge of your seat. Paramount’s disc offers up reference-quality audio and video along with a bevy of features. Check out reviews of the entire Mission: Impossible franchise (on 4K) here, here, here, here and here.

Disc Features
  • (2.39:1) Aspect Ratio
  • Video Codec: HEVC (H.265)
  • Audio: Dolby Atmos
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Audio Commentary
  • Deleted Scene(s)
  • Featurette
  • Documentary
  • Digital Copy
  • 2 Disc Set
  • IMDb Information Certified Fresh 97%
Mission: Impossible – Fallout (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray)

5
must own!
Video
Audio
Extras