Brian de Palma

Sisters: Criterion Collection (Blu-ray)

Reporter Jennifer Salt thinks she has witnessed a murder; apparently, Margot Kidder is the killer and Lisle Wilson is the victim. By the time the authorities arrive on the scene, there is not one scintilla of evidence. With a private eye's help, Salt gets to the bottom of things.

Mission: Impossible (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray)

After he is framed for the death of several colleagues and falsely branded a traitor, a secret agent embarks on a daring scheme to clear his name in this spy adventure. Though it drew its name from the familiar television series, director Brian DePalma's big-budget adaptation shares little more with the original show than the occasional self-destructing message and the name of team leader Jim Phelps (Jon Voight).

Phantom of the Paradise (Blu-ray)

Referencing vintage horror, Alfred Hitchcock, and the '70s vogue for supernatural terror, Brian De Palma used his favorite genre to take aim at the sensation-seeking rock audience and the exploitative entertainment machine, skewering such '70s trends as '50s nostalgia and glam rock. With splitscreen effects, he underlines the cost of putting media reality before life, as fame becomes the ultimate Faustian bargain.

Raising Cain (Blu-ray)

A complicated thriller, directed with great visual style by Brian De Palma, Raising Cain is the story of twin brothers, Carter and Josh (John Lithgow), one good and one evil, who will stop at nothing to find children to further their father's psychological experiments. John Lithgow is outstanding in the role of the brothers. Lolita Davidovich, is also good as his wife Jenny, who he may or may not have murdered. To even identify the other characters would give away too much of the complicated plot, which twists and turns, leaving the audience constantly guessing who is really who.

Dressed to Kill: Criterion Collection (Second Print)

Just as Brian De Palma's Obsession rewrote Vertigo, Dressed To Kill rewrites Psycho. This time out, however, De Palma displays far more wit in an overhaul enjoyable for even those less immersed in Hitchcockiana than himself. Criticized for its sadism, the film might more accurately be described as an exploration of the sadism already implicit in Hitchcock's work, particularly in a bravura opening sequence featuring Angie Dickinson.

Dressed to Kill: Criterion Collection (Blu-ray)

Just as Brian De Palma's Obsession rewrote Vertigo, Dressed To Kill rewrites Psycho. This time out, however, De Palma displays far more wit in an overhaul enjoyable for even those less immersed in Hitchcockiana than himself. Criticized for its sadism, the film might more accurately be described as an exploration of the sadism already implicit in Hitchcock's work, particularly in a bravura opening sequence featuring Angie Dickinson.