Logan (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray)
Review by: Matt Brighton
Posted on: May 24th, 2017
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Plot: What’s it about?

It’s the end of an era. An old friend you haven’t seen in a while. It’s difficult to believe that Hugh Jackman, whose career has been defined by this character, was a last minute replacement in 2000’s X-Men. But here we are, seventeen years later, and it’s now impossible to envision anyone else in the role. Jackman, virtually unheard of, when he took on the now iconic role in 2000 nailed it home and has embodied the Marvel character like few others could. He’s been a part of 8 of the X-Men movies and their spinoffs and Logan marks the third, and final, installment. And yes, we’ll count his two words in X-Men: First Class, as a reprisal of his role. But all good things must come to an end and this is where the rubber meats the road for Logan aka James Howlett. It’s a bit difficult to connect all of the dots with this character and the X-Men Marvel universe (not associated with the Marvel Cinematic Universe in any way, shape or form) so I won’t bore you with timelines, alternate timelines and the like. Rather this is a character study of one of the most popular and ideally complex ever written. And it just so happens he’s got a skeleton made of metal and has razor sharp claws that extend from his forearms.

Set in the future, 2029 to be exact, in a world where mutants are now few and far between. We don’t know what happened to them and, to be frank, it’s not pertinent to the storyline. Logan (Hugh Jackman) now works as a limo driver near the Mexican border. Caring for his former mentor, Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) and an albino mutant named Caliban (Steven Merchant), the trio live in sequester for their sanity as well as the safety of others. His life changes when he meets Gabriela (Elizabeth Rodriguez) and Laura (Dafne Keen). They’re in transit to “Eden”, a rumored safe haven in North Dakota. Gabriela needs Logan’s assistance to help them complete the journey as they’re being pursued by the maniacal Pierce (Boyd Holbrook), whose intentions aren’t good at all. Like it or not, Logan is stuck in the middle and through a series of events, he, Charles and Laura are now on the run and being pursued by Pierce and company.

That’s all you’re getting in regard to plot. I don’t want to spoil anything and I won’t get too involved in detail.

What sets Logan apart from other superhero movies is that there’s nothing too “super” about it. It chooses to be about the man, rather than a showcase for his abilities. If you want to see those, there’s no shortage of films in which we see Logan become, well, Wolverine. There aren’t any leather costumes, no over the top special effects and certainly no “amnesia bullets” (the less said about those, the better). It’s a character study of a man who’s ailing both physically and mentally and copes via alcohol and anger. In a way, Logan, a man who has been labeled as a “mutant” for most of his life, is one of the more human characters I’ve seen. Both Jackman and Stewart turn in probably their best performances with these characters and it’s a testament to young Dafne Keen as she holds her own with these two veterans. Logan is a different kind of film, and the film gives him a more elegiac quality.

Video: How’s it look?

This is a rather difficult one to assign a single score to. The four disc set contains four different versions of the film. There are two 4K discs, one with the theatrical version on it and the other Logan Noir. Each of these discs also has a Blu-ray counterpart.

Theatrical Version
The look and feel of the theatrical version is certainly different from the previous X-Men films and the stand alone Wolverine movies. Set in a pseudo dystopian future of 2029, this has more of a Mad Max look to it than anything else. The majority of the movie takes place in Texas, so browns and natural, earthy tones tend to dominate. Contrast seems to be bumped up a bit as we see more wrinkles, deeper cuts and the like. Then again, this takes place some 40 years after the last film, so this might have been intentional. Suffice it to say that this 2.39:1 HEVC image certainly looks the part and putting it up there with some of the better-looking transfers so far.

Logan Noir
For those that don’t know, this is the exact same film only it’s presented in black and white. This is similar to what Warner did with Mad Max: Fury Road only they called it a “Black and Chrome” edition. Nevertheless, it’s two sides of the same coin. Oddly, both Logan and the aforementioned film do share a lot of the same characteristics when it comes to overall landscape and general look and feel. Yes, Max was a bit more ostentatious, but it fit with the theme of the film. There are several moments and scenes that do really favor the black and white version of the film, but I feel that this is – by and large – more of a gimmick than anything else. Still, it’s nice to have this and I do applaud the filmmakers for trying something outside the normal scope.

Audio: How’s it sound?

One thing that doesn’t seem to make sense is the audio mixes. The Ultra HD versions (both theatrical and Logan Noir) contain a Dolby Atmos mix and their Blu-ray counterparts have a DTS HD Master Audio mix. Nothing against the DTS mixes, they sound phenomenal, but it might have made more sense to keep it consistent throughout the four disc set with an Atmos mix on each. At any rate, the sound is flat out super. The score resonates with a menacing vibe that really sets the tone, vocals are strong and crisp. Hugh Jackman has had nearly two decades to perfect his character. Patrick Stewart’s Xavier, broken and confused, still manages to sound authoritative and strong. Surround effects get plenty of play here as do the LFE. Atmospheric sounds bombard the viewer from every angle and create a veritable pool of sound to get lost in. The DTS HD Master Audio mixes on the Blu-ray’s is nearly as good, though there were a few instances in which I noticed more depth on the Atmos mix. No matter which version you go with, you’ll be satisfied.

Supplements: What are the extras?

This four disc set is pretty diverse, though the supplements remain consistent through three of the four discs. The majority of the extras reside on disc three – the theatrical Blu-ray version of the film. The audio commentary appears on all four versions of the film and is consistent throughout.

Disc One: Logan Ultra HD/4K

  • Theatrical Version
  • Audio Commentary – James Mangold isn’t new to the character of Wolverine, he also helmed 2013’s The Wolverine. Mangold had some very specific ideas when it came to this film and, in conjunction with Jackman, brought several of those to the film. I really enjoy Mangold’s commentaries, he’s very articulate, not afraid to tell it like it is and you can tell that a lot of planning and preparation goes into his projects.

Disc Two: Logan Noir Ultra HD/4K

  • Black and White version of the film
  • Audio Commentary – James Mangold isn’t new to the character of Wolverine, he also helmed 2013’s The Wolverine. Mangold had some very specific ideas when it came to this film and, in conjunction with Jackman, brought several of those to the film. I really enjoy Mangold’s commentaries, he’s very articulate, not afraid to tell it like it is and you can tell that a lot of planning and preparation goes into his projects.

Disc Three: Logan Blu-ray

  • Deleted Scenes – Available with or without commentary by James Mangold.
    • Logan gets a ticket
    • Alternate dinner scene
    • Caliban death
    • Bobby’s action figures
    • Medical tent – connect the dots
    • Mutant kid puppet master
  • Making Logan – Running just over an hour, this is actually a series of six featurettes that, when lumped together, form a “documentary” of sorts. Each has their own specific area of the film that it covers. These can be played individually or via a “Play All” feature.
    • Crafting the Story – The basic idea and premise behind the film and what it would entail.
    • Casting the Film – If you count all of the “bad guys”, this is actually a pretty large cast. Other key roles like that of Steven Merchant and Eriq La Salle are also mentioned.
    • Designing the World – We get a look at the world of 2029 was designed and the look for the film overall.
    • Creating the Score – Mangold explains how he wanted a different type of score for the film, not triumphant music when the good guys were on screen and low bass when the bad guys were.
    • Stunts and Fights – A look at the choreography for some of the action and stunt sequences.
    • Wrapping Logan – We get a final farewell to our clawed and flawed anti-hero.
  • Audio Commentary – James Mangold isn’t new to the character of Wolverine, he also helmed 2013’s The Wolverine. Mangold had some very specific ideas when it came to this film and, in conjunction with Jackman, brought several of those to the film. I really enjoy Mangold’s commentaries, he’s very articulate, not afraid to tell it like it is and you can tell that a lot of planning and preparation goes into his projects.
  • Theatrical Trailers

Disc Four: Logan Noir Blu-ray

  • Black and White version of the film
  • Audio Commentary – James Mangold isn’t new to the character of Wolverine, he also helmed 2013’s The Wolverine. Mangold had some very specific ideas when it came to this film and, in conjunction with Jackman, brought several of those to the film. I really enjoy Mangold’s commentaries, he’s very articulate, not afraid to tell it like it is and you can tell that a lot of planning and preparation goes into his projects.

The Bottom Line

It’s sad to see Hugh Jackman and his portrayal of Wolverine come to an end. But, in his defense, he’s done a fine job and has played him in eight films (seven in great length). When you look at it, that’s more than any of the actors who have played James Bond have done. Logan is a different kind of film than the other movies featuring the character, but it’s also the right way to end things. Reference-quality audio and video perfectly compliment one of the year’s best films. Highly recommended.

Logan (Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray)
MOVIE INFO.
YEAR RELEASED
2017
RATING
R
DIRECTOR
James Mangold
STUDIO
Twentieth Century Fox
RUNNING TIME
137 min.


Certified Fresh 92%
TECH SPECS
  • 4K
  • BLU-RAY
  • (2.39:1)
  • Video Codec: HEVC (H.265)
  • Audio: DTS HD Master
  • Audio: Dolby Atmos
  • 4 Disc Set
  • DISC FEATURES
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Audio Commentary
  • Deleted Scene(s)
  • Featurette
  • Documentary
  • Digital Copy

DISC SCORES

VIDEO
AUDIO
SUPPLEMENTS
OVERALL